Summary of RAW vs JPEG: The Real Truth

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00:00:00 - 00:20:00

This video compares the differences between shooting raw and JPEG images. It states that shooting a high quality JPEG image saves space than shooting a raw image, but most of the time you can tell which image is being shot.

  • 00:00:00 Raw photo files are the unprocessed image data from a camera's sensor, taking up a lot of storage space and requiring post-processing to improve image quality. Jpeg files are compressed files that take up less storage space and can be processed more easily, without sacrificing image quality.
  • 00:05:00 The video discusses how JPEG compression can degrade image quality, leading to "banding" or "striping" in images. The presenter demonstrates this by comparing two different JPEGs: a "large" one with 1920 by 1080 pixels, and a "fine" one with 1280 by 1024 pixels. When shooting a raw file, the camera can fit up to 1820 photos on a memory card, but with a jpeg, only 473 photos are possible at the large setting, and only 3527 at the fine setting. The medium size setting is also reduced to 3840 by 2560 pixels, and the small size to 3648 by 2496 pixels.
  • 00:10:00 In this video, the author explains the advantages and disadvantages of shooting raw vs. JPEG photos. Raw photos are large and take up memory card space and computer memory, but they offer more flexibility in post-production. Jpeg photos have automatic adjustments applied, but they look better right away without any post-processing. Raw photos don't look their best until they are processed in software, while jpeg photos look better right away.
  • 00:15:00 The main advantage to shooting raw photos is that they have more potential for post-processing to make them look better, while the main disadvantage is that they take up more space and are slower to write to the memory card. However, if you're shooting for documentary purposes or for fast frame rates, jpeg files are fine. And, if you want to post-process your photos but don't need the highest possible image quality, you can shoot both raw and jpeg files simultaneously.
  • 00:20:00 This video compares the differences between shooting raw and JPEG images. It states that shooting a high quality JPEG image saves space than shooting a raw image, but most of the time you can tell which image is being shot.

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