Summary of Lying to Ourselves: Dishonesty in the Army Profession

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00:00:00 - 01:00:00

The video discusses a study that found that dishonesty is commonplace in the Army profession, with 90% of surveyed soldiers admitting to lying at some point in their careers. The video discusses how technology has made it easier for soldiers to conceal their lies, and how this has led to a self-image of arrogance and superiority among dishonesty-prone soldiers. The video suggests that the Army should address the problem by acknowledging it and taking measures to prevent future incidents.

  • 00:00:00 The US Army War College is hosting a lecture series on dishonesty, titled "Lying to Ourselves: Dishonesty in the Army Profession." The speakers, Dr. Leonard Wong and Dr. Steven Garris, discuss a study that found that company commanders are required to fit two hundred ninety seven days of mandatory requirements into two hundred fifty-six available training days, with few opportunities for training autonomy.
  • 00:05:00 The video discusses the research conducted by two Army officers, which showed that most army officers lied about their mandatory training requirements. The officers came up with the idea of conducting a study to find out why this was happening. They gathered groups of officers from different branches and military departments and asked them about their training requirements. The study revealed that most officers were reporting training requirements that were impossible to complete. The officers concluded that this deception was detrimental to the army's reputation and was preventing troops from achieving their full potential.
  • 00:10:00 The author discusses the prevalence of dishonesty in the military profession, citing examples of dishonest behavior such as mandatory training being faked, leave forms being falsified, and storyboards for events being created without proper documentation. The author suggests that the trend of dishonesty is due to a general lack of trust between soldiers and their commanders, and that it has serious consequences both on the battlefield and off.
  • 00:15:00 The video discusses the issue of dishonesty in the military profession, specifically in the area of trip reporting. It points out that many people have created a system where dishonesty is rewarded, and that this has led to many problems. The video suggests that a system where dishonesty is punished would be more effective in maintaining honesty in the military.
  • 00:20:00 The video discusses dishonesty in the military profession, specifically the dishonesty of officers and Raiders. The video cites a study that found that as a result of ethical fading, many soldiers do not realize that what they are doing is a lie. The video discusses ways to ethically deceive oneself, including agreeing to do something before knowing all the facts, and not being aware of the consequences of one's actions.
  • 00:25:00 The article discusses the study, "Lying to Ourselves: Dishonesty in the Army Profession." The study found that dishonesty is commonplace in the Army profession, with 90% of surveyed soldiers admitting to lying at some point in their careers. The article discusses how technology has made it easier for soldiers to conceal their lies, and how this has led to a self-image of arrogance and superiority among dishonesty-prone soldiers.
  • 00:30:00 This video discusses ways in which dishonesty may be used in the army profession. For example, a requirement may be too difficult to meet, leading to the need to tell a small lie. Another example is when a new lieutenant is taking over and is checking out the area, an AED goes off. The captain tells the lieutenant that he falsified the incident report to make it look like the lieutenant was responsible for the AED going off.
  • 00:35:00 The creator of the video discusses the concept of dishonesty in the Army and its consequences. He points out that if dishonesty is allowed to run rampant, it can lead to careerism and a lack of trust. He also discusses the issue of hypocrisy, noting that junior leaders are taught to lie in order to get by in a competitive environment.
  • 00:40:00 This video discusses how military members often lie to themselves to avoid admitting to mistakes or shortcomings. It suggests that the Army should address the problem by acknowledging it and taking measures to prevent future incidents.
  • 00:45:00 The video discusses the Army's struggle with honesty, specifically in regards to directives related to electronic cigarettes. It argues that there is a need for senior leaders to be more honest with their subordinates, and that mid-level leaders need to be more willing to exercise restraint. Finally, the video discusses a recent study that found that Army leaders were forced to lie to their subordinates about the importance of attending academic conferences.
  • 00:50:00 The video discusses a study that suggests that officers often lie to themselves. It also discusses the reactions of senior leaders and the force at large to the study. Phase 1 of the reaction is anger and denial from the senior ranks, while Phase 2 sees little evidence of change. Phase 3 kicks in, with senior leaders beginning to realize that the problem may be bigger than they thought.
  • 00:55:00 The video discusses how dishonesty can permeate the army profession, leading to a decreased trust in leaders. Phase three of a study done on the topic outlined ways in which the army can improve their attitude towards honesty, among other things.

01:00:00 - 01:20:00

The video discusses the problem of dishonesty in the Army profession, and how it can be addressed by addressing management issues and training soldiers on how to use data properly. It also points out that the problem is exacerbated by a culture of wanting to solve problems through adding more bureaucracy and regulations.

  • 01:00:00 The speaker discusses how dishonesty is rampant in the military profession, and how it is caused by fear of risk and careerism. He suggests that the top leadership is not solely to blame, and that the problem can be solved by the bottom-up implementation of better procedures.
  • 01:05:00 The speaker discusses the issue of dishonesty in the Army profession, noting that it is a common trait of any hierarchical organization. He recommends that officers at every level try to lead truthfully and acknowledge the problem.
  • 01:10:00 The video discusses the problem of dishonesty in the Army profession, and how it can be addressed by addressing management issues and training soldiers on how to use data properly. It also points out that the problem is exacerbated by a culture of wanting to solve problems through adding more bureaucracy and regulations.
  • 01:15:00 The presenter discusses the problem of dishonesty in the military profession, citing examples of when leaders have put requirements on their troops that are not necessary, leading to troops being evacuated from their positions. He also points out that dishonesty is often rewarded in the military, leading to a careerist mentality among leaders. The presenter argues that the problem lies with the leaders themselves, who accept dishonesty as a standard and disregard those who speak truth.
  • 01:20:00 In this video, a lieutenant colonel discusses the history of lying in the army. He notes that the problem has been ongoing for at least 29 years, and that it is a difficult topic to discuss. He recommends that a historical report be written on the topic.

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